Are these architectural wonders on your bucket list?

These architectural marvels, as highlighted by Architectural Adventures, are must-sees for all architecture lovers.

© Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons

The Famed Duomo in Florence

Italy

Dominating the center of Florence, the Renaissance dome is the world’s 4th largest cathedral and took about 140 years to build.

Milan’s Giant Gothic Cathedral
Italy

As the largest Gothic cathedral in the world, Duomo di Milano has more figures than any other building in the world with 3,400 statues, 135 gargoyles, and 700 figures.

The Todaiji Temple
Japan

Once one of the powerful Seven Great Temples, the Todaiji Temple houses the world’s largest bronze statue of the Buddha Vairocana and serves as the Japanese headquarters of the Kegon school of Buddhism.

The Parthenon
Greece

Built during the Athenian Empire rule in honor of the goddess Athena, the Parthenon, the sublime Doric temple, serenely fulfilled its function as the religious centre of Athens for over a thousand years.

The Taj Mahal
India

One of the finest and most sophisticated examples of Mughal architecture is the iconic Taj Mahal, or “crown of palaces,” which was named as such to refer to the beauty of the deceased Persian princess and wife to Shah Jahan.

Alhambra’s Beauty
Spain

The most famous of the three main sections of the Alhambra are the Nasrid Palaces, which feature the Alhambra’s signature Moorish architecture and mosaic-work.

©Travis Witt / Wikimedia Commons

The Mission Concepción
Texas, United States

The Mission Concepción is the oldest unrestored stone church in America, and part of the San Antonio Missions UNESCO World Heritage site.

Marek Holub / Wikimedia Commons

Sagrada Família
Spain

The Mission Concepción is the oldest unrestored stone church in America, and part of the San Antonio Missions UNESCO World Heritage site.

Richard Mortel from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia / Wikimedia Commons

Rector’s Palace
Croatia

Notice effortless combination of Renaissance and Baroque elements showcased throughout the Rector’s Palace, also serving as Dubrovnik’s ornate cathedral.