A practical option for the home, the intricate detail and design of rugs are often overlooked by the average customer. To make an informed rug purchase and to know exactly where your money is going, it is important to note that there is much more to buying a rug than just picking one out that matches your couch.

Between knotted, tufted or flat-woven, rug options could seem endless and daunting for a buyer to understand. But, each of the many rug types available on the market serve different purposes, and getting to know them can help buyers make the right choice for their home. Doris Leslie Blau rug gallery breaks down what to know about the five most popular rug constructions, along with their most advantageous use.

 

Hand-Knotted Rugs

Hand-knotted rugs are considered classics. They are made of colored yarns that are painstakingly tied onto individual warp threads, then secured by one or more rows of weft, a process that requires a great amount of skill and patience. The knotting of a large rug could involve as many as a dozen artisans working simultaneously for months, even years. The result is a sturdy, dense structure that can withstand years without wearing out.

 

 

 

Flat-Woven Rugs

Basic and attractive, these rugs are popular across the globe. The maintenance is low and the rug itself is light and flexible, yet durable. Most are made to be reviserbale, which extends its lifespan even further.

 

Hand-Tufted Rugs

A more affordable option than knotted carpets, this rug is a great pick for mid-range durability and style. The designs of the rugs can be easily manipulated, from traditional to contemporary, with much textural detail.

Flat-Woven Rugs

Basic and attractive, these rugs are popular across the globe. The maintenance is low and the rug itself is light and flexible, yet durable. Most are made to be reviserbale, which extends its lifespan even further.

 

Needlework Rugs

Embroidery fans rejoice! These rugs are large needlepointed masterpieces, with an antique look yet a dependable weave that will last years in the home.

 

Photos courtesy of Doris Leslie Blau